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Weaseling Out


When you read my account with Doug Feith and with others, you will see the sort of weaseling out of individual responsibility, the total and abject failure to accept involvement. Read Mr. Feith’s book. on how to fight the so-called war on terror. And it’s as though the man had no involvement in the decisions relating to interrogation of detainees. And yet, as I describe in the book, the man was deeply involved in the decision making from step one. So it’s about individual responsibility. And there’s been an abject failure on that account.(Think Progress)

You could take Phillip Sands' word for it or you can see Feith trying to escape responsibility yourself. In the spirit of full disclosure, I should tell you that I've seen the edited interview that was broadcast, but I can't bring myself to find the full 20 minute interview at The Daily Show site.

These people defy reality. Everyday they look reality in its face, deny its existence, and act as if it's not happening. They believe that if they say often enough that what we think happened, isn't what really happened, that Iraq could have happened to anyone; that they have not left the country less safe, our military weaker; that the country is not worse off than it was 8 years ago; that there are not more terrorist attacks worldwide than before the war on terror began. that becomes the new reality. Is there really anyone left who doesn't feel that everything this administration says is either a lie or bullshit?




(Crooks and Liars)

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