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The Road to Fudge Hazelnut Supreme

When the shutdown first began I became a little obsessed with the Bon Appétit Chef Makes online series with pastry chef Claire Saffitz. She made a number of things I'd pondered making over the years like pop-tarts, tater tots, and Ferrero Rocher chocolate hazelnut balls. I decided to follow her example to give myself something to think about other than politics and the pandemic by re-creating an ice cream I last ate in Seattle in the late 90s. The ice cream was called Fudge Hazelnut Supreme (or Fantasy) it was a vanilla ice cream with a fudge hazelnut ribbon and chocolate covered hazelnut pieces. It's the best ice cream I've ever eaten.

The Destination

In the process of creating my version of the ice cream I contemplated a hazelnut ice cream base before deciding that it needed to be vanilla to fully contrast the ribbon. The process for infusing the ice cream with hazelnuts for that recipe helped me perfect the vanilla flavor of the base. For the base, chocolate covered hazelnuts, and fudge ribbon you'll need: 

  • 3 cups heavy cream 
  • 1 cup milk 
  • 2 vanilla beans 
  • 6 egg yolk
  • 1/2 tsp salt + a pinch
  • 2/3 cup + 2 tsp sugar
  • 5 oz + 30 roasted hazelnuts
  • 10 oz chocolate 
  • 1 tbsp hazelnut oil (or other lightly flavored oil)

The fudge hazelnut ribbon is a nutella ganache based on this recipe with less chocolate and more heavy cream. You can make your own nutella or use the less perfect over the counter version. If you decide to make your own start by throwing the following ingredients into the bowl of a food processor:

  • 5 oz roasted hazelnuts
  • 2 tsp suga
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 vanilla bean pod

Pulse until the nuts are crushed then turn to high until it becomes a paste. Drizzle in:

  • 3 oz chocolate
  • 1 tbsp hazelnut oil 

Process until completely mixed. It will be very loose initially and will set over time. It makes slightly less than a cup, all of which will go into the ganache. To make the ganache place 4 oz of chocolate in a medium, heat proof bowl. Heat 1 cup heavy cream until almost boiling and pour over the chocolate. After the chocolate has melted mix in the nutella. This will make enough ganache for at 4-6 batches of the ice cream. 

For the chocolate covered hazelnut pieces I found it better to cut the nuts into rough eighths rather than crushing them, putting aside flakes and smaller pieces to use later. Tempering the chocolate results in the best texture. It's apparently a pain in the ass using the typical stove top process. I prefer the sous vide method. Place the nut pieces and 3 oz of chocolate into a waterproof container or vacuum seal bag and follow the sous vide directions. When I feel dedicated to the details I temper the chocolate in a glass bowl, checking the temperature at every stage, when ready coat a few pieces at a time, and then spread the coated pieces on a silicon mat. More often I vac seal everything, empty it on the mat after it reaches temperature, and quickly try to separate the pieces before the chocolate cools.

To make the vanilla ice cream base heat:

  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 1/2 scraped vanilla bean pods

until 170°. Remove from heat and once room temperature refrigerate over night. The next day re-heat to 170° and pour into a non-reactive bowl. When the pan is cool to the touch add
  • 6 egg yolks
  • 2/3 cup sugar
Whisk for 2-3 minutes. Return the milk and cream to the pan and mix thoroughly. Cook on medium, stirring and scraping, until the temperature reaches 170°. Strain into a bowl. Once it cools to room temperature refrigerate or place in ice bath until the temperature drops to 39°. Churn according to the directions for your machine.

Once the churn is complete combine ice cream, hazelnut pieces, and fudge hazelnut ganache using this as a guide. Cover and freeze until firm.

Stops on the Road: Sidequests

 While trying to figure out how to make ice cream and create a recipe for the fudge hazelnut ribbon I also had to contend with 6 boxes of melted Whoppers.


As a result I created the second best ice cream ever made, which I initially called Whopper Beach but am now calling Malt and Iced Fire. It requires
  • 3 cups heavy cream 
  • 1 cup milk 
  • egg yolk
  • a pinch salt 
  • 2/3 cup sugar
  • 12 oz of your favorite malted candy
Start by pulverizing 8oz of the malted candy into a fine dust in a food processor. Place the rest in a silicon or plastic bag and crush with a blunt object.

Heat the heavy cream, milk and malt candy powder until 170°. Remove from heat and once room temperature refrigerate over night. The next day re-heat to 170° and pour into a non-reactive bowl. When the pan is cool to the touch add the egg yolks and sugar.

Whisk for 2-3 minutes. Return the milk and cream to the pan and mix thoroughly. Cook on medium, stirring and scraping, until the temperature reaches 170°. Strain into a bowl. Once it cools to room temperature refrigerate or place in ice bath until the temperature drops to 39°. Churn according to the directions for your machine. Once the churn is complete mix the crushed pieces into the ice cream. Cover and freeze until firm.


I also had a semi-successful attempt at a Whopper Cake




and multiple attempts which were complete failures


and gave me the opportunity to make cake balls


Deciding that successfully making a cake had nothing to do with perfecting my ice cream, I decided to rest on my cake balls.

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