Skip to main content

What's a Warranty Between Friends?

I have been a Virgin Mobile customer since I returned to the US in 2012. It reminded me of the low pressure nature of the relationship with mobile companies in Spain. I purchased their low end phone to try out their service (and smartphones). Overall I have found their service to be perfectly functional. There is one exception, it's kind of ironic, the phone service sucks. I have to stand by my bedroom window or lean over the balcony railing to hear and be heard clearly. I don't actually mind. I hate talking on the phone but enjoy the pocket computer. After a year I decided to upgrade to a Samsung Galaxy 3, at the time 2 generations behind their most recently offered S5. I purchased my S3 from Radio Shack (RIP).  Six months after that purchase, while vacationing in California, I had trouble charging the phone. It required that I prop something under the cord to ensure connection. After some back and forth, although I purchased the phone through Radio Shack, Virgin sent first a replacement battery, and when that failed to solve the problem, a replacement phone. This is significant to the rest of the story.

I finally decided to upgrade after the Samsung Galaxy S8 was released. I bought it through Virgin Mobile based on their service when my S3 failed me. I noticed in the first few months that occasionally it wouldn't be charged when I removed it from the charger and would make a point of making sure the cord was fully seated each night. After several months I found that what had seemed like carelessness on my part was actually an issue with the phone. It had deteriorated to the point where I couldn't maintain contact with the charger unless I applied constant pressure. I used a rubber band. When I contacted Virgin about the problem with my phone they assured me that it was my fault for dropping the phone or exposing my waterproof phone to water.  They also recommended that I contact Samsung, since they were a mobile carrier and not the manufacturer of the phone. I reminded them that they were the vendors of the phone that was still under warranty and set out over a series of emails back and forth to determine what their warranty meant. In the end I learned that their warranty means nothing. See for yourself. It makes me wonder if this is the world consumers can expect going forward (jk, not really wondering, it is). I would definitely recommend not purchasing your phone through Virgin Mobile. They're happy to take your money but their warranty is worthless. Apparently, I'm not the only one with complaints about their customer service.



















Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Anti-racism - Class = Status Quo: The Neoliberal Argument Against Coalition

I was approached a few months ago around the idea of collaborating to make the progressive case for reparations. I've said before that while the idea of reparations is morally appealing I don't believe in them as an immediate political project. It's not clear to me that it's possible to build a coalition around a reparative justice focused on just 13% of the population. Encouraged by a recent Twitter conversation that included economists Sandy Darrity and Darrick Hamilton where they suggested that saying reparations will never happen is cynical I've begun trying to think of them as an eventuality and lay out the steps to reaching them. Doing this has made clear that our understanding of reparations as a form of compensation to the descendants of the enslaved is not the reparative justice that we think it to be. If we were living with the kind of understanding of justice that made reparations possible we would not be a nation where war, healthcare, education, and cr

'Anti-racism', All Trap, No Honey: A Discourse About Discourse

One of the things that prevents me from writing more often is the sense that I'm just writing the same thing repeatedly from a slightly different angle. In a nutshell, all I'm saying is that moral idealism substituted for material goals will not lead to justice, but is an argument against materialism. I'm a dumb person's low rent Adolph Reed Jr. translator. I'm a "class reductionist" who understands that when the discourse is reduced to just class there's nothing as important as food, water and shelter that's left out. I often find myself contending with people who insist that there is, unable to name anything. They don't understand that they're making an argument against economic redistribution, or they don't care. There are no concrete manifestations of systemic racism or any oppression that are not dealt with through economic redistribution. When people say that economic redistribution won't end racism, what they mean is that

Is Cynicism More Disqualifying Than Ignorance?

I was somewhat reluctant at the time to ascribe any specific intent to Elizabeth Warren's DNA stunt, just focusing on what it said about her political instincts. In retrospect, because of subsequent choices, I see it as craven cynicism. I get that, "I have a plan for that!" is supposed to be her new brand, but obviously, a working plan isn't a central part of that. Her brand should actually be "Pandering Cynic". I now find myself wondering if even she thinks the policy she offers will do what she says it's intended to do. I've been saying in my head that I feel irrational anger towards her, but it's actually quite rational and specific. My posting schedule has been off because I've been playing with the idea of submitting pieces for publication. I've been thinking a lot about how we talk about disparities and how the conversation is used as a cudgel against universal policy. The closest to a good faith version of this argument is