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The Left is Done With the Whole 'Alt-Left' Thing, Right?


I used Twitter for the first time in 2013 to win a CD from The Liquid Crystal Project.  It didn't become a regular part of my social media consumption until the inauguration. It's been informative; hilarious; useful for helping me to refine my perspectives on different topics; unexpectedly hopeful at times; seeming conspiracy theories that turn out to be true; and straight up conspiracy theories and bullshit. Through the back and forths in comment threads it offers a snapshot of different 'movements'.  It's also really easy to see how trivial differences are magnified while obscuring important ones. One of the strangest things I've seen is people not just arguing about the existence of the "alt-left" but arguing with specific people that they are in fact representatives of the "alt-left". Now that Fragile Ego has used it it's over right?  Now that the left has invented this term for him the left must be done with it.


or 'femi-nazi' it sounds just as stupid,


To be clear, the same applies to the term 'BernieBro".  It's a strange thing to label a group of multi-ethnic progressives that includes women.  There are absolutely sexist 'bros' who continue to support Bernie, but there are sexist people who supported Hillary.  Sexism and racism don't exist just in the hearts of Bernie primary supporters, they are in the heart of the Democratic Party; these principles are part of the foundation of this country.  The first time anyone blocked me on Twitter was a woman decrying Bernie's racist lack of support for reparations when I pointed out that the position was shared by Hillary and Obama.  If you have felt a need to use these terms, in the interest of honest conversation, please stop.  If you fee the need to continue, consider these words from Davis Shuster:


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