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Are the Polls Really This Close? Really?

If any Republican can overcome the wretched stain of eight years of George Bush and win the White House we deserve whatever bad things will happen to us.

Jack Cafferty




I realize that this is a best of the worst of McCain, but I can't imagine anyone putting together similar clips of Obama, that offered as frightening a glimpse of the man as future president. What makes this frightening is that most of these clips are from the last few months. He has made so many gaffes that he can have a 5 minute blooper reel based on three months of appearances. Actually saying gaffes seems generous, he places Iraq on the Pakistani border, thinks Czechoslovakia is still one country, Putin is the current president of Russia and Germany, and doesn't know which extremists Iran is supposed to be sending into Iraq. He either regularly misstates the facts or doesn't know what they are, and he constantly contradicts himself. What is most frightening is that McCain's distance from reality is no more discussed in the mainstream media than the fact that the Maverick is dead. Instead they talk about the effectiveness of his negative ads. Considering the problems the country is facing, the more relevant question to be asking is why would McCain's campaign sink millions into an ad featuring Paris Hilton, instead of promoting his positions and policies. At this point in the campaign I don't believe that McCain is even an improvement over Bush. I'm not sure if he holds any conviction that he wouldn't trade for votes. He has changed his position on every issue which once set him apart from his party, immigration, campaign finance, torture; going so far as to abandon his own bills. I can't imagine the damage he would do to the nation as President. Although I know it seems easy to say living in Spain, I agree with Jack.



h/t crooksandliars.com

Update: I'm not the only one who thinks would be no improvement over Bush.

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