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Slower Trains Are Coming

It's been a while. I've been trying to start writing again. But with the amount of crap that seems to be going on in the US or because of Prez & Co., outside the US, it's like trying to jump onto a speeding train. Living outside the country it's difficult to tell if the state of the nation would seem so dire were I there, or if the population would seem, if not apathetic, as disconnected as it seems now. I'm not sure what an American population that is tuned into the rapid decay of the nation would look like. Or if the corporate owned media would actually portray that politically involved population. Still, I don't think I'm seeing that.

The US stands for torture now. Prez & Co. want free reign to monitor telephone and email communications in the country, of American citizens.....My god I have to stop there. This administration is a Pandora's box of bad and wicked shit. The list is too long, the offenses too many to recount or adequately summarize. What I can say is that even now it should be clear that this administration is basically a criminal enterprise. It may be hyperbole to say it, but that doesn't make it untrue. They're laundering money through no bid contracts to contractors with direct ties to the administration. (I guess it's reverse laundering, taking clean tax dollars and reverting them to crap.) Their actions with Valerie Plame, the almost 4000 dead soldiers in Iraq, and breaking of the armed forces is treasonous. I hope the full degree of damage will someday be known and repaired, but enough is known now that people should be in the streets. or something.

As I sit in Barcelona I feel like I am watching the rapid demise of my nation and wondering how that is at all acceptable. I'm also wondering if I would know what to do if I were instead sitting in NYC, Seattle, or Nashville.

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